Africa

Promoting Smart Policy Options in Closing the Gender Digital Divide in Uganda
Promoting Smart Policy Options in Closing the Gender Digital Divide in Uganda 24 November 2021 Women of Uganda Network and the Centre for Multilateral Affairs

This policy brief highlights what the Women of Uganda Network (WOUGNET) and the Centre for Multilateral Affairs have been doing over the past two years in closing the gender digital divide in Uganda, as well as analysing the state of this divide and offering recommendations to various stakeholders.

Kenya adopts community networks licensing framework
Kenya adopts community networks licensing framework 23 November 2021 Mwendwa Kivuva for KICTANet

The Communications Authority of Kenya adopted a Licensing and Shared Spectrum Framework for Community Networks after holding a public consultation in the country and promoting a process that allowed the development of the framework in partnership with multiple stakeholders.

AfriSIG co-conveners reignite internet access discourse during the COVID-19 pandemic
AfriSIG co-conveners reignite internet access discourse during the COVID-19 pandemic 22 November 2021 Kenneth Matimaire

The COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent lockdowns have brought into stark relief the implications of digital inequality in Africa, said key partners who helped organise the 2021 African School on Internet Governance (AfriSIG): APC, Research ICT Africa and the African Union Commission.

AfriSIG 2021: “You must know everything!”
AfriSIG 2021: “You must know everything!” 19 November 2021 Zanyiwe Nthatisi Asare

Unless you are an astronomer, architect or engineer, most of us toy with this question: “When will I use the Pythagorean theorem in real life?” In reality, this question is true for most things that are perceived as complex.  

AfriSIG 2021: We can't do it alone!
AfriSIG 2021: We can't do it alone! 19 November 2021 Tshepiso Hadebe

It was June 2010, the schools were about to go on a long break. The eyes of the world were on South Africa. The first African country to host the FIFA world cup. Huddled in the corner of the small and dusty school library, a little girl came across a book that spoke of computers and the internet.

AfriSIG 2021: “Oh AfriSIG, where art thou AfriSIG?”
AfriSIG 2021: “Oh AfriSIG, where art thou AfriSIG?” 11 November 2021 Josaphat Tjiho

I remember sitting down writing that application like someone who was writing a state of the nation address speech for a president.

Yay! We did it, AfriSIG 2021 happened!
Yay! We did it, AfriSIG 2021 happened! 08 November 2021 Ruth Atim

The ninth edition of the African School of Internet Governance (AfriSIG) finally happened – virtually, because, well, COVID-19 couldn’t allow various fellows and facility members to attend an in-person school. 

AfriSIG 2021: A unique approach to Africa’s internet development
AfriSIG 2021: A unique approach to Africa’s internet development 03 November 2021 Kenneth Matimaire

What happens when an ardent internet governance activist has to suddenly place themselves in the shoes of the private sector? Or a social tech enthusiast has to play the role of the government during a simulation? Does the shift of perspective strengthen everyone’s grasp of internet governance?

AfriSIG 2021: Does Africa really need the internet?
AfriSIG 2021: Does Africa really need the internet? 02 November 2021 Anne Wangari Njathi and Tsema Yvonne Ede

When discussions around access to the internet are raised, our thoughts turn to whether we have sufficiently solved the issues of poverty, health, education and energy to decide that internet access is a needed right in Africa. But COVID-19 has changed our view of the need for connectivity.

What can digital surveillance teach us about online gender-based violence?
What can digital surveillance teach us about online gender-based violence? 01 November 2021 Mardiya Siba Yahaya for GenderIT.org

Mardiya Siba Yahaya argues that digital surveillance is part of gendered and racist disciplinary structures that manifest in specific forms of online gender-based violence experienced by Black Muslim women influencers.

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